Leveson has put the media’s privacy problem on full public display

Paul McMullan’s views are callous, but it’s true that privacy can be a cloak that hides as well as a sanctuary that protects

If you were planning to write a play about the phone hacking scandal – and I’m sure someone is – then the worst tabloid journalists will be drawn just like Paul McMullan who yesterday gave evidence at the Leveson inquiry. A more off-putting example of the species it would be hard to invent, and yesterday, like a pantomime villain, he stepped out from the shadows to spill the beans. Yes, phone hacking and other dubious practices had been routine. At no point did he appear more villainous than his breathtaking defence of these practices on the ground that “privacy is the space that bad people need to do bad things in”.

Full article: http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2011/nov/30/leveson-inquiry-media-privacy

This image of the Dowlers should be a reminder to the power elite

It was the Dowlers’ suffering that finally brought phone hacking to public attention. Their pain should never be forgotten

The settlement between Rupert Murdoch and the Dowler family announced this week, and the photos that accompanied it, were a powerful reminder that it was the fate of one young girl and the ongoing suffering of her family that is at the heart of the phone-hacking story. Murdoch’s empire foundered eventually not on dirty tricks employed with spoilt celebrities but because his employees added to the suffering of a family who had already suffered too much.

Full article: http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2011/sep/21/dowlers-phone-hacking-power-elite