Inside the hospital that’s leading a kindness revolution: Concluding our series on the crisis of compassion in nursing

You might expect Ward B47 to be a depressing place.

The majority of patients are aged over 80 and the expectation is that 30 per cent will have passed away after three months.

All have mental health issues such as dementia, Alzheimer’s or confusion.

Full article: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2277169/Inside-hospital-thats-leading-kindness-revolution-Concluding-series-crisis-compassion-nursing.html

Aged 94, and frail as a china doll, Sophia struggled to get out of bed. ‘Come on!’ said the nurse. ‘You’re just being lazy’

On Saturday, in the first part of an uncompromising investigation into nursing in NHS hospitals, Ros Coward asked why so many nurses seem to have stopped caring for their patients. Today, in the wake of the damning report into Stafford Hospital, she suggests the troubling answer…

Sarah Allen is in her 20s.

After a recent asthma attack, she found herself in an unusual situation when she was admitted to a ward in a large London hospital where the other patients were mainly elderly, and several were suffering from dementia.

There, she was able to see for herself whether the terrible stories of patient neglect in the NHS — which have become so common in recent years — were true.

What she saw shocked her.

Full article: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2276796/Aged-94-frail-china-doll-Sophia-struggled-bed-Come-said-nurse-Youre-just-lazy.html

Why have so many nurses stopped CARING? An investigation into the crisis-hit NHS

  • Robert Francis QC’s report was merely the latest damning indictment
  • Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt warned that cruelty and neglect had become normal in some hospitals and care homes

My 89-year-old mother has suffered with dementia for the past seven years. Over that time she has been in and out of hospital. Some of her care has been excellent, but some has been shocking.

Once, when she collapsed, she was taken to Kingston Hospital, in South-West London. After a long and stressful evening in A&E, a bed was eventually found for her at midnight. 

What a relief, I thought — she was safe and I could go home. As I stooped to whisper goodbye, a nurse shoved something in my face. ‘Sign this,’ she said bluntly. It was a form to absolve the hospital for any loss of my mother’s valuables.

Full article: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2275943/NHS-Why-nurses-stopped-CARING.html